Key Fact 3

Teachers' Guide

This is the main guide for healthy eating for children aged 5-8 years.

Key Fact 2

People choose different types of food.

Key Fact 1

Food is a basic requirement of life.

Key Fact 3

We all need to eat a variety and balance of food to stay healthy, as depicted in the Eatwell Guide.

Bwyta’n Iach

Croeso i’r modiwl Bwyta’n Iach i blant rhwng 5 ac 8 oed.
Key Fact 3

Key Fact 3: We need to eat a variety and balance of food to stay healthy, as depicted in the Eatwell Guide

This section provides you with detailed teaching plans for Key Fact 3, including links to all the downloadable resources.


a) To be able to recognise and name the 5 groups from the Eatwell guide model.

Show the children the Eatwell Guide Poster 100 or The Eatwell Guide PowerPoint 102 to introduce the Eatwell guide.

Explain to the children that all foods can be sorted into 5 groups. Name each group:
  • Fruit and vegetables;
  • Potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy carbohydrates;
  • Dairy and alternatives;
  • Beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins
  • Oils and spreads

Discuss the heading for each group. 
  • What foods might be in each group?
  • What foods can they name? 

Using the Food Cards 100, ask the children if they can put the cards into the right groups.  Repeat this 5-8 times, ensuring that children understand each group.

You may wish to use the Eatwell Cards 101 with the children. They show each food group individually. Children could name the foods shown in the photographs.

Other: A teachers’ guide to the Eatwell Guide Guide 100 is available to download. This shows you the foods in each group.

You may wish to use our Eatwell Guide videos to support the introduction. 

b) To be able to sort a selection of foods into the Eatwell Guide food groups.

Arrange the children into groups.  Give each group an enlarged photocopy of the Eatwell Guide Worksheet 104 and copies of the Food selection Worksheets 105. Ask each group to cut and stick the foods into the correct areas on the Eatwell guide.  

Children could place the cut outs in position first so they can be checked first.

If groups finish early, they can draw other foods on to their worksheet.

You may wish to have the Eatwell Guide Poster 100 available as reference.


c) To be able to put together a balanced meal by choosing foods from different food groups.

Show children the Eatwell Guide Poster 100 or The Eatwell guide PowerPoint 102.

Ask the children what they notice about the Eatwell guide.  You may wish to prompt discussion, e.g.

  • Which are the largest groups?
  • Which is the smallest group?
  • What is this trying to tell us?

Explain that this shows us which sections we should eat more/less from. Check that children can identify which foods they should eat more/less.

Explain to the children that to stay healthy we have to eat a balance and variety of foods from the 4 main sections of the Eatwell guide.  We should not to eat many of the foods from the 5th group, Oils and spreads. Test children have grasped these ideas by asking questions such as:

  • Would it be healthy if I just ate foods from the fruit and vegetable section?

No, that is not a balance.

  • Would it be healthy if I always ate one particular food from each group, e.g. peas, chapattis, yogurt, tuna and sweets?

No, emphasise balance and variety.

Set the children the challenge of planning a healthy lunchbox using the Eatwell guide. 


d) To know that everyone should eat at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables everyday.

Show children the Eatwell Guide Poster 100. Explain that they are going to look at the fruit and vegetable group in detail. 
Show the children the Fruit and vegetables card from the Eatwell Cards 101. Ask the children to say what foods they can see in this group.

Discuss with the children what they think should be eaten from this group each day. 

Tell the children that everyone should eat at least 5 portions* of fruit and vegetables every day.  Variety is important.

Ask the children what they like in this group and what fruit and vegetables they ate yesterday.

Explain to the children that all different types of fruit and vegetables count, for example:
  • fresh
  • frozen, e.g. frozen peas
  • dried, e.g. raisins
  • canned, e.g. sweetcorn or carrots
  • juice, e.g. orange juice.
Draw an imaginary character on the board.  Ask the children to help you plan how the character can eat at least 5 A DAY. Note what the character will eat and when.

* As a rule of thumb, a portion is what fits into the palm of a hand. Juice/smoothies - a combined maximum of 150ml per day.


Plenary

Use the The Eatwell Guide PowerPoint 102 to go over what the children have learned. Use the questions to test their understanding.

Use our Eatwell Guide videos to consolidate learning.

Further activities
Get children to make some of the foods they have planned for their lunchbox.

Create displays about the 5 food groups in the classroom.

Make a series of different foods to promote the four main food groups, for example:
  • Fruit and vegetables: fruit salad;
  • Potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy carbohydrates: scones, jacket potatoes and their fillings;
  • Dairy and alternatives: fruit smoothies;
  • Beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins: sandwiches and wraps.
(Recipes: Fruit salad, Scones, Jacket potatoes, Smoothie, Sandwich wrap, Triple decker sandwich)

Downloadable resources