Key Fact 4

Teachers' Guide

This is the main guide for healthy eating for children aged 8-11 years.

Key Fact 1

Around the world people choose and combine different foods to make meals and snacks. The total amount and range of foods eaten is called the diet.

Key Fact 2

A healthy diet is made up from a variety and balance of different foods and drinks, as depicted in the eatwell plate.

Key Fact 3

To be active and healthy, food is needed to provide energy for the body.

Key Fact 4

A variety of food is needed in the diet because different foods contain different substances that are needed for health. These are nutrients, water and fibre.

Key Fact 5

Being active and looking after yourself are important for health.

Energy balance guidance

This guidance will help you make effective use of the Energy balance activity and draw out the key teaching messages.

Make a healthy lunchbox!

What will you have for lunch?

Make a balanced plate!

Can you match the food to the groups?

Unmuddle the meals

What will you eat today for breakfast, playtime, lunch and dinner? Find out how meals are made from ingredients from different food groups, and how you can eat a balanced diet.

Alisha and Ronnie

Can you help Alisha or Ronnie make smart choices for their meals throughout the day? You'll see how what they choose affects their eatwell plate.

Energy Balance

New! Help Jordan or Nicola achieve energy balance over a day. You'll see what they eat and 'do' affects their energy balance. Good luck!
Key Fact 4

Key Fact 4: A variety of food is needed in the diet because different foods contain the different substances that are needed for health. These are nutrients, water and fibre.

This section provides you with detailed teaching plans for Key Fact 4, including links to all the downloadable resources.


a) To understand that all food and drink provide nutrients.

Introduction
Use the Nutrients PowerPoint 153 to introduce this Key Fact, learning objectives a-g.


b) To understand that energy is provided by the nutrients carbohydrate, fat and protein.

Ask the children to rank the Nutrient Cards 153 for foods providing the most/least protein, fat and carbohydrate. 

Compare the amount of energy provided by different nutrients using the Nutrient Cards 153.

  • Is there an association? (For example, margarine provides 81.6g fat and 3039kJ energy per 100g, compared with a tomato that provides 0.3g fat and 73kJ per 100g.)

c) To understand that other nutrients include vitamins and minerals, which are needed to keep the body healthy.

Use the Nutrient Cards 153 to identify those foods that provide:
* calcium;
* iron;
* vitamin C.

  • Are there any groups of foods that supply similar nutrients?
  • Which foods provide the most/least?

d) To understand that some foods also provide fibre. This is not digested by the body.

Use the Nutrient Cards 153 to identify those foods that provide fibre.

  • Which provide the most fibre?
  • Which provide the least?

e) To recognise that the amount of energy and nutrients provided by food depends on the portion eaten.

Ask the children to compare the energy and nutrients provided by foods per 100g and per portion size.

  • What do they notice?
  • Does portion size affect the amount of energy and nutrients provided?

Use the Nutrient Portions  Worksheet (Excel) 164 to model the effect of changing portion size on the nutrients provided.


f) To understand the functions of different nutrients.

Introduce the functions of the different nutrients. Ask the children to design a poster to show the functions of the nutrients. You may wish to use the Nutrients PowerPoint 153.

Organise a cooking session, which highlights different nutrients. For example, the children could make:

  • a range of sandwiches, using different breads and fillings, e.g. ham, egg, fish, beef, hummus;
  • different fruit smoothies, e.g. strawberry, banana, milk and yogurt;
  • salads for a party, e.g. potato, rice or pasta;
  • a fish dish, e.g. mackerel pate, smoked haddock samosas.

Recipes for a sandwich wrap, smoothie, cous cous salad, mackerel pate and smoked haddock samosas are available to download at the bottom of this page.  You can find more great recipes on the Cooking module. 


g) To recognise the nutrients provided by each section of the Eatwell plate.

Review The eatwell plate. Identify the main nutrients provided by each food group. You may wish to use the Nutrients PowerPoint 153.

Use the Nutrient Cards 153 to identify which foods belong to each group.

Ask the children to complete the Eatwell plate and nutrients Worksheet 165 to test their understanding.


Plenary

Recap with children


All foods provide nutrients.

Energy is provided by the nutrients carbohydrate, fat and protein. Other nutrients include vitamins and minerals.

The amount of energy and nutrients provided by food depends on its size, known as a portion.

Different nutrients have different functions in the body to keep us healthy.

Further activities

Get children to write a healthy eating report for the school newsletter or website. They could also write recipes or produce a storyboard about healthy eating in a day.

Get older children to produce a PowerPoint presentation about the nutrients provided by food.

Downloadable resources