Key Fact 1

Teachers' Guide

This is the main guide for Cooking and Food Skills for children aged 8-11 years.

Key Fact 1

Around the world people use a range of different ingredients, equipment and cooking techniques to prepare food.

Key Fact 2

When planning to cook we need to consider current healthy eating advice, the needs of different people and occasions.

Key Fact 3

When planning to cook, we need to select the most suitable ingredients, equipment and food skills for successful results.

Key Fact 4

There is a range of additional food skills which enable us to cook.

Key Fact 5

Buying, storing, preparing and cooking food safely and hygienically are vital for health.

Videos: Peel, chop and grate

See how to prepare fruit and vegetables safely.

Cool creations

Non-cook recipes for the primary school classroom.

Videos: Cool creations

See how to make some recipes that do not need any cooking!

Hot and happening

Recipes that involve the use of the grill or hob.

Videos: Hot and happening

See how to cook delicious hot meals.

Brilliant baking

Baking recipes for the primary classroom.

Videos: Brilliant baking

See how to bake a range of recipes.

Sensory work with food

Explore the senses.

FFL Podcast

The FFL podcast has been produced to provide teachers with news and information about food education in primary schools.
Dumplings Steaming

Key Fact 1: Around the world people use a range of different ingredients, equipment and cooking techniques to prepare food.

a) To know that there is a vast range of ingredients used around the world.

Set up a sensory tray for the children. Have the following foods(or similar) on a tray:

  • Lemongrass;
  • Root ginger;
  • Fresh basil;
  • Lime;
  • Fresh beetroot;
  • Pesto.

Allow the children to touch and smell each food. If you do not have the ingredients, use the Extended foods Cards 251 to act as a stimulus.

  • What are they called?
  • Who has tasted these before?
  • How are they used in cooking?

Depending on what you have available, you could allow children to try a small sample of each food. You need to get permission first from a parent/carer (see Guide 251). For ease, you could provide a range of fruit and vegetables that the children could sample.

Extend the activity by asking:

  • Who can name any other unusual ingredients?
  • Where does it come from?
  • How is it prepared?
  • How does it taste?
  • How might you eat it?

Gather the responses on the board. Use the New foods SMART Board 251 or PowerPoint 251 to help facilitate discussion.

Ask the children to keep an unusual food diary for a few days – who can name the most? Use the Unusual food diary Worksheet 251.


b) To understand that diets around the world are based on similar food groups.

Use the World diets PowerPoint 252 to look at the types of foods eaten by different people around the world that make up their diet.

Ask the children:

  • What types of foods are eaten?
  • Can you identify any similarities?
  • Can you place these foods into groups?

Remind the children about The eatwell plate. Using the What goes together? SMART Board 252 and/or the Blank eatwell plate Worksheet 252, ask children to sort the different foods from around the world into groups.

Children should be able to explain that although there are many different types/varieties of foods, they all come from basic food groups. For example, most diets in the world comprise:

  • Fruit and vegetables;
  • Bread, rice, potatoes, pasta and other starchy foods, e.g. yam, plantain, cous cous (sometimes these are known as staple foods, forming the bulk of the diet);
  • Milk and dairy foods;
  • Meat, fish, eggs, beans and other non-dairy sources of protein.

Although there are lots of different foods, diets around the world are based on similar food groups to help people to stay healthy.


c) To know that food is prepared in different ways due to a number of factors, including country, culture, custom and religion.

Talk to the children about how food is prepared around the world. Discuss how people from different countries and cultures prepare, cook and eat food in a variety of ways.

Use the World food PowerPoint 253, show children how food is prepared, cooked and eaten differently in a variety of countries.

  • What type of food is being prepared?
  • What equipment are they using?
  • How is the food being cooked?
  • How is the food eaten?

Ask children, in pairs, to create a food around the world journal investigating different ingredients, cooking equipment and methods.

Module link: Healthy eating 8-11 Key Fact 1. This link provides support on food and religion.

Demonstrate to the children how to make an exciting curry or stir-fry. Organise the children so that they can see you clearly. Select some children to help prepare some of the ingredients, e.g. quarter tomatoes or chop coriander. Use the Demonstration Guide 1 to help set us this fun activity. Alternatively, use the Stir-Fry and Curry in a Hurry Videos to stimulate discussion.


Plenary

Recap with children:

  • There is a vast range of ingredients used around the world.
  • Diets around the world are based on similar food groups.
  • Food is prepared in different ways due to a number of factors, including country, culture, custom and religion.

Present the work about food around the world as a classroom or school display. Set up a display of photographs, non-perishable ingredients and cooking equipment.

Invite speakers, parents/carers and local organisations to talk about, and perhaps cook, different foods from around the world.

Organise further tasting and cooking sessions to investigate different types of food.


Downloadable resources